How ANU is digitising administrative processes to drive efficiency

Over the past two years, The Australian National University (ANU) has introduced a range of improvement initiatives designed enhance administrative services to better support teaching and research outcomes.

In 2014, ANU began their transformation journey with the roll-out of automated and standardised travel processes across the university. From there, digitalisation of processes became a core focus of their transformation project, and in 2015 Intelledox Digital Transformation Centre was established to improve efficiency and service delivery by digitising processes across functions.

“We started with a list of about 170 key end-to-end processes that were identified by our academics and our administrative communities as being high pain-point processes. Over the last 20 months we have digitised over 22 per cent of those processes,” says Lakshmi West, Director, Intelledox Digital Transformation Centre at ANU.

While the journey to date has not been without challenges, ANU is set to realise some big wins over the next couple years as a direct result of standardisation of processes and improved data quality and reporting.

“In July 2016 we had an independent audit done by a third party management audit team over a six month period to find out what the net benefits of digital transformation can be. The result is we achieve over $6.1 million of net benefit over the next seven years for the work we have done to date,” says Lakshmi.

So what strategies are Lakshmi and her team using to ensure successful process improvement throughout the university? And, more importantly, what steps are they taking to engage academics and stakeholders in the journey to ensure ROI?

Ahead of Higher Education Services Transformation 2016, Lakshmi shares how ANU built the business case for transformation, the core tools they are using to roll-out digital process improvements function by function and the key lessons other universities can learn from their journey to date.

Proof of concept: justifying the case for transformation

“ANU’s transformation journey began in 2014 when we were given a donation from two alumni who own a company called Intelledox, which provided us with software and perpetual licensing that allows data integration.

To prove that the technology and transformation would work at the University, in 2014 I project managed a small team of people to digitise, streamline and automate the travel approval process across the University. At the time, we had over 10 independent paper based forms and there was no standardised process.

We used Intelledox to roll-out digital transformation of travel approval and it was a major transformation –  not only  did we streamline and simplify the process, we  also standardised it. We also integrated this process within the Finance system, the HR system, DFAT, Electronic Records Management and the data warehouse.

This initial project changed practices. For example, administrators used to make travel arrangements on behalf of academics. We made the strategic decision that academics were to become responsible for their own travel, so the administrator was removed from the process.

The automated travel process was a proof of concept to demonstrate we could successfully digitally transform a process at the University. The aim was to show the academic community and the ANU at large that by accepting the donation from Intelledox, transformation would actually work in practice and not only in theory.

We have had many failed IT business transformation projects at ANU in the past. Even travel had two failed attempts before we picked it up. It was therefore important we could show digital transformation could work to gain the trust of the university community.

Based on feedback and research from administrative services surveys, travel approval was the most bureaucratic  process and a big pain point for academics. Since the project went in 2014, we have had about 30,000 travel approvals that have been initiated through this new digitally transformed process.

Off the success of that project, we created the Intelledox Digital Transformation Centre in 2015 with the aim to digitalise approximately 170 key end-to-end processes that were identified as pain-points by our academics and administrative community.

It has been a rapid journey starting the Centre. We started with travel, but we have since expanded our scope. Our approach was to transform function by function. For example, transform HR and find out as much as we could in a six to nine month block of transforming their processes and rolling-out those c hanges. The next step was then moving into the student space and making changes in a six to nine month block as well.”

Read the remaining case study here to further learn about how ANU is:

  • Rolling-out digital process improvements function by function
  • Engaging academics and end-users to ensure successful transformation
  • Learning from past mistakes to drive successful organisational-wide transformation

Download Case Study

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If you found this blog post interesting, you might also like to check out the Higher Education Services Transformation Agenda here

For more information visit www.highered-servicestransformation.com.au or call +61 2 9229 1000 or email enquire@iqpc.com.au

10 things to consider when launching shared services in higher education

At University Transformation 2015 day one, there was a lot of discussion in the room about best practice in shared services. In the final session of the day, attendees were asked to brainstorm key strategies that resonated with them when it came to planning or implementing shared services.

They were asked by conference chair Joanne Austin, Faculty General Manager Business and Law at Swinburne University: what do you have to think about when launching shared services? What are the major pain points, and, how do you overcome them?

Below is a summary of the discussion, highlighting 10 key things to consider when launching shared services in higher education:

1. Culture and people

University transformation involves moving people from different functions into a new service or team. And the reality is, there are some people who will come into a shared service and it won’t be right from them. It’s important to be clear from the very beginning to define shared services and how people can fit into it. It is equally important to give people the opportunity to move on if they don’t fit – one bad apple can spoil the barrel.

2. Avoid the ‘big bang’ approach

Transformation is not a quick-fix journey. It can seem like a reasonable option to take a ‘big bang’ approach to transformation, but change needs to be incremental and happen over time for it to be most effective. Make sure you road map what you want to achieve out of your transformation before you begin.

3. Break down silos

Transformation, in any sector, requires change. For the higher education sector, this involves moving people from different functions or faculties into on centralised service. This means it is important to look at processes and functions end-to-end. Do not change processes within departments – best practice would be to talk to people who are on the ground, listen to what your people are saying and make the change from the ground up.

4. Be agile

If a new process is not working, move on. Give it a chance, try to be innovative but be prepared to move on quickly if it fails. Listen, learn and adapt.

5. Change leadership

Without effective leadership, it is hard to determine a future view of what an shared service should be. Transformation requires a change leader who knows the vision and has the skills to move things fast, but at an incremental level. The world around us is evolving and organisations have to move quickly to keep up. If you have the right leadership, it will help with moving ahead with your shared service or vision. It will also make it easier to communicate that vision throughout the organisation.

6. Bring people along with you

Bring people along with you – talk to people, find out their ideas. Bring your people along the journey: work together with them to avoid an ‘us’ and ‘them’ mentality. Emails or town hall meetings are not enough. Talk to people and find out what they know.

7. Measure as you go

Some of the changes getting made during transformation are done with the absence of data – which makes it hard to know: is the change for the better? Sometimes you have the feel for it, but sometimes you don’t. Where possible, collate and collect data as you go to track your progress. This will also make the second phase of your journey a lot easier. Monitor everything as you go along and shift things when they are not working.

8. Understand the business at all its different levels

Transformation requires a consideration at how the business functions at all levels. Sometimes, one function might think they do know the business at different levels and will try to impose their own ideas on how things should be run – but this will not work. You need to understand change and how the business works from a holistic business level.

9. Scalability

Consider the impact of scalability – can you scale up your shared service? Consider that as you go. Plan for the future.

10. Location

Where are you going to locate your staff? Do you locate them in a central area? Or where the client is? Be smart in your provision for shared services so internal customers can find what they need easily.

If you found this post interesting, check out SSON’s upcoming Planning and Launching for Shared Services Conference, taking place in Sydney, in February 2016.

For more information click here or email enquire@iqpc.com.au

Moving Finance up the value curve at Monash University

In 2009, Monash set out on a transformation journey to improve the delivery of financial services to the organisation with three objectives in mind:

  1. To improve the efficiency and the effectiveness of finance services
  2. Achieve operational cost savings across the organization
  3. Enhance financial governance, business intelligence, compliance and risk management.

Since embarking on their transformation journey, Monash has realised some impressive results – including a 20 per cent reduction in costs across the business and an improving internal customer satisfaction by 25 per cent.

Ahead of University Transformation 2015, Nicole Tournier, Director of Finance Strategy at Monash University shares the core strategies her team is using to improve operational efficiencies through transformation, and the key lessons learnt along the journey so far.

To learn more about Monash University’s business transformation journey, download the full case study Driving business efficiencies through finance transformation at Monash University here.

For more information about University Transformation 2015, download the brochure here or visit www.universitytransformation.com.au